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You used to sleep well. You could fall asleep almost anytime, anywhere. Lately, however, you’ve been lying awake at night. There aren’t enough sheep in the world to count before you fall asleep, if you even get there.

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What causes sudden insomnia?

There are many different things that cause sudden insomnia, including stress and anxiety, cancer, Parkinson’s disease, chronic pain, and more. If you’ve suddenly developed insomnia, it could be one of these common causes behind it.


1. Stress Is One of the Most Common Insomnia Symptoms

Insomnia is often caused by stress. If you’re upset or worried about something, you may have difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep. Even if you can get to sleep, it may not be restful.

Stress is both a cause and a symptom of insomnia. Insomnia can often stress out the patient, as they become increasingly frustrated and worried about their lack of sleep. Sleep deprivation can have some fairly serious effects on health, so it’s little wonder an increased stress response is a symptom.

You might want to try meditation, stress management, and better sleep hygiene if you want to get back to better sleep sooner.


2. Anxiety and Depression Are Common Culprits

Other common causes of insomnia include anxiety and depression. Anxiety often engages the same sorts of stress responses that can keep you awake at night. The difference is that stress is often the result of external factors, while anxiety is often internalized.

Depression may be another reason you’re awake at night. While some people with depression sleep longer hours, others may find themselves awake and unable to sleep.

Like stress, anxiety and depression are also common insomnia symptoms and can be difficult to treat.


3. Parkinson’s Disease and Other Conditions May Keep You Up

Other conditions that might cause sudden insomnia include Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Both of these diseases interfere with normal functioning in the brain, which can lead to interrupted sleep cycles. This, in turn, can result in insomnia symptoms.

In turn, insomnia symptoms include impaired cognitive functioning. Over time, chronic sleep deprivation can permanently impair brain function.


4. Chronic Pain Might Keep You Awake

One of the most common causes of insomnia is pain. Chronic pain is particularly known for its role in insomnia. When pain is bad enough, it may keep you from falling asleep.

Chronic pain can also mean it’s difficult to stay asleep. For chronic pain patients, treatments such as medical cannabis may be a good option. Not only does medical cannabis act as a sleep aid, it can also help relieve pain symptoms that may be keeping you awake.


5. Medications Can Also Cause Insomnia

Some medications are also indicated in cases of insomnia. Certain medications may affect the levels of chemicals in the body by increasing the production of chemicals that inhibit sleep or by decreasing the levels of chemicals that cause you to feel tired.

If you’ve recently started a new medication, check to see if difficulty sleeping is one of the side effects. It could be that you need a lower dose or a different medication. Your doctor might recommend another medication to help you get the sleep you need.

There are many different reasons you may experience sudden insomnia. These are just a few of them. If you don’t normally experience insomnia, you may want to seek medical attention as soon as possible. Some medical conditions also present with insomnia, so it’s best to check.

If you do have insomnia and you’re interested in getting a good night’s sleep, talk to your doctor about your options. Sleep aids like medical cannabis could be the answer for you.


how-medical-cannabis-is-changing-ptsd-treatment

Dr. Michael Verbora

Michael earned an MBA from the University of Windsor’s Odette School of Business in 2009 and an M.D. from Schulich School of Medicine at Western University in 2013, before entering a Family Practice residency at the University of Toronto. A member of the Canadian Consortium for the Investigation of Cannabinoids, Doctors for Responsible Access and the Canadian Pain Society, he has completed over 2,000 cannabinoid therapy consultations and has presented many talks in community and hospital settings while serving as student health physician at Seneca College and Medical Director, Canabo Medical Clinic.

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